Americas Now | In-Depth

Americas Now | In-Depth

Detailed, long-form reports featuring current events in the Americas and crafted by our correspondents deployed throughout the region.

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Americas Now | In-Depth
  • Ex-White Supremacist Rises Above Hate in Divided United States

    The Southern Poverty Law Center has tracked more than 900 hate groups across the United States. Since 2017 the organization also has witnessed a 55 percent spike in the number of hate groups.
    Attacks by white supremacists have claimed dozens of lives within the last 2 years. Racial tension, viole...

  • Humberto de la Calle: Peace Negotiator

    Humberto de la Calle is a Colombian lawyer, politician and diplomat, who will be most-remembered for his role as a peace negotiator.

    In 2016, Colombia signed a peace agreement with Latin America’s oldest and largest rebel group, the FARC. De la Calle was at the head of the government negotiatio...

  • NOLA silenced by COVID-19

    The city of New Orleans became one of the earliest hot zones for COVID-19.  

    Consider this sobering statistic. More people have now died from the Coronavirus than were killed by Hurricane Katrina 15 years ago.  

    While the crisis is abating, doctors and nurses are worried about a second wave, on...

  • Violence picking up in Mexico despite National Guard

    A year ago, Mexican president Manuel Lopez Obrador promised that military forces, then highly criticized by Human Rights advocates, would leave the streets.  

    The newly-created National Guard, a sort of alternative to the police and the military, were tasked with the protection of the Mexican pe...

  • A long business relationship reshaped by politics

    Having the world’s largest economy as your next-door neighbor can be a challenge. Mexico has managed to have a good partnership with the United States. But in recent years the rules for trade have changed.

  • Are cloned horses good to Polo?

    Polo is called the “sport of kings” and Argentina's players are considered royalty ranking among the world´s best.  The same goes for their horses with a new strategy.  Argentine cloned horses are designed to win. 

    Joel Richards has the story on how science changed the nature of the sport forever.

  • FARC killings haunt peace efforts in Colombia

    In 2016, Colombia ended a 5-decade armed conflict with the FARC. Many of the rebels tried to re-enter civilian life. But dozens of them were shot and killed under mysterious circumstances.  

    Correspondent Michelle Begue reports on these former combatants who met a violent end after the country e...

  • The U.S. is the country with the highest number of nuclear reactors

  • Helping a city recover from one of Latin America’s worst COVID-19 outbreaks

    Ecuador’s largest city, Guayaquil, was hit hard by COVID-19. In fact, it’s faced one of the region’s worst outbreaks. As their healthcare system began to collapse, tons of help flowed into the city in the form of donations.

  • The knee of a white police officer ignites protests around the world

    The death of George Floyd while in custody of Minneapolis Police triggered a wave of activism around the world. Correspondent Mike Kirsch went to the state of Minnesota to report first-hand about inequality, police brutality and a community demanding change.

  • Demonstrators gather at the Malcolm X Park in Washington D.C. to protest

    Some 27 million people have participated in marches since 20-17.  That’s according to researchers from Harvard University and the University of Connecticut.  Correspondent Toby Muse takes a closer look at what it means to take to the streets and stand up for rights.  

  • Underfunded Chicago hospital leading the COVID-19 fight

    The fight against COVID-19 in the most overwhelmed areas of the United States, put a huge strain on the resources of hospitals in the country’s poorest areas.  

    Roseland Community Hospital in Chicago, Illinois, was already tending to a community plagued with a myriad of poverty-related diseases,...

  • Infected deportees sent back to Guatemala cause a rise in COVID-19 cases

    In Guatemala, one in every 6 cases of coronavirus has come from abroad. But those infected aren’t tourists, expats or visitors. They are deportees sent back from the United States. Some have become the target of bullying and rejection for allegedly spreading the disease to their hometowns.

  • A_Covid Anti-vax movement

    Scientists around the world are working against the clock to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. But hundreds of thousands of people in the US oppose it. They believe immunization is not always a good thing. So where do they stand “now” and why?

  • Applying for asylum in the U.S. during the pandemic

    According to U.S. law, someone eligible for asylum may be permitted to remain in the country for the duration of the process. But that can take years and most asylum seekers are not allowed to obtain a work permit.

  • Ex-pats riding out COVID-19 in Mexico

    Lake Chapala, in Mexico's Jalisco state, used to be a place to go for a quick, seasonal trip in Mexico for thousands of Canadian and European tourists. But many of them fell in love with the beauty and tranquility of the place and decided to stay forever and call it home.   

    With COVID-19 ending...

  • Indigenous in Peru fear COVID-19 pandemic

    As the Coronavirus pandemic continues to spread around the world, indigenous groups are especially worried.  

    They tend to be more susceptible than the general public to viral infections.   

    And often they have little or no access to modern healthcare.  

    They fear COVID-19 could decimate their...

  • COVID-19 forcing Venezuelan immigrants to return home

    The Coronavirus pandemic has brought huge economic uncertainty to countries across the globe. And for many Venezuelan migrants it has presented them with a tough decision: To leave the place where they have re-located or return home to a country that is broken.

    Venezuelans migrated to neighborin...

  • Voices from The Wall

    ‘The wall’ between the United States and Mexico has become as divisive politically and socially as it is literally. A key platform during Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, ‘the wall’ has continued to make global news. But as construction continues to reinforce sections of the barrier, the num...

  • Seattle: The first US COVID-19 Epicenter

    It all began at a nursing home in Washington state. Or at least that is what it was known at the time. When the first deaths from the coronavirus took place researchers began testing and scientists sounded the alarm. But the invisible enemy was already spreading throughout the community.

  • Arms trafficking is a “Big Business” in Central America

    MS-13 is one of the most dangerous gangs in Central America.

    In El Salvador, almost one out of every 10 people is involved in gangs and criminal activity. The gangs are well-armed but where are they getting their weapons?

    Correspondent Mike Kirsch went to San Salvador looking for answers.

  • Indigenous communities fight HIV deep in the Peru's Amazon rainforest

  • A worsening epidemic targeting Mexicans